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that are responding in a military environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with thcivilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up
, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willin
happy while being in san francisco there is such an amazing attention to the environment. people are very environment conscious and i see community aggregations also to have renewable energy. it makes me very happy because in italy we have been following this path for a very long time. for example in the first six months of this year we installed photovoltaic panels larger than the united states all put together. it shows you the extent of the revolution happening. i am sure italian companies will be happy to work with the local institutions that have started to generate projects that will somehow go in that direction, and also we want to have parties and communication activities to show the people in the street that it is important to have sustainable behaviors and not to leave a carbon footprint behind us. >> [inaudible] >> yeah, if i understand correctly because -- you said about the innovation -- if we? >> [inaudible] >> yeah, okay. well, we're going to have in the museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create sil
and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it h
people that are driving. it helps to protect the environment. so, it really helps to protect everybody. and that's really very important for us. one of the major roles the health department is having is analyzing the data. for example, we now have a geo database that's bringing in data from demographics, the way people drive, the density of people that are walking through different corridors of the city, and we're able to see by looking at that type of data that more than 50% of the fatal and severe injuries, pedestrian injuries occur in about 5% of the streets in san francisco. and you'll be hearing more about -- those will be the areas that will be more focused. , and so, i want to just thank you for your time. (applause) >> thanks, tomas. the public health lands that dph has brought to roadway safety has really, i think, made us all much better and it's going to make our programs a lot more effective. * lenz it's we're in the final stage of development. we're grateful to have them on board. having a strategy is good, but it's only good if we actually execute on it. and the people o
of the environment is here as well (railroad noise). >> yes and all positive activities. the railway station is historic and it will remain that way, so again welcome to heron's head park. by the way for those of you who don't know why it's named this way is because if you ever have a chance to get above this area and see it literally is shaped like a heron's head and this is part of the honoring of our waterfront area. it's a great investment and of course it will lead me to say with the responsible, and this year is our proposition b which extends another great investment of $195 million to many other areas including the south east sector of open space that we got to take care of, and modernize. this is what rec and park does very well with dpw with all of the capital leadership in the city that i got to work on with the city administrator. we need to take care of the infrastructure in many ways and we are loving our parks and why we want this great investment to continue and this is another small yet important addition. we will have $35 million more of that with the connection with the
of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we have a better shot at than, say, other places where large distances have to be traversed in most american cities to kind of get to the places you want to get. here in san francisco, we have been blessed by the geometry where our trips are short where 40 years ago we realized that this was the way we will have to kind of meet our future. the iron call part of that is at the same time europe also discovered that and they made strides to towards actually implementing these alternative choices, we have found it very difficult to kind of wean ourselves from the convenience of being able to. i say it is still convenient to drive. as long as the alternatives are not just as convenient, we won't be able to make our case about our travel modes as contribution to the detriment of the environment or to the detriment of our health as we all know the sun is by date getting madder at us and angle grier at us and we are getting fat. we got to do something about it. this is the time to do it. we have the best opportunity here with these f
haven't followed the mayor wanted name, but if you look at labor, the environment playing out that way, a variety of social and cultural issues is always, importantly health care you mentioned is always the same coalition for certain stability there and a huge overlap and that's a terrific thing. >> is this interesting paper we see as part of the larger process of reallocation between state and federal government. how much leeway to see up on that administration have? i don't find very -- that would be fine if you had 2 million dvd agents is better than we do have, but how much room does the lord gave you? >> i think what all their shows as federalism is alive and well is the real of 60 kind of wandered the concepts in our country for obvious reasons, but even that term now is coming to be embraced by newer generation of something positive because you see controversial issues as you identified the address of the state level. that's a good thing happening here. it's easy when you're middle-aged man like me to brood about. the rule of law, what are we going to do? but we've had a lot of
is an ordinance authorizing the department of the environment to accept and expend a grant in the amount of $13,100,000 from the california public utilities commission, through pacific gas and electric company, to implement an energy use and demand reduction through energy efficiency program and amending ordinance no. 165-12 (annual salary ordinance, fys 2012-2013 and 2013-2014) to reflect the addition of five grant funded positions (fte) at the department of the environment, for a term from january 1, 2013, through december 31, 2014. >> thank you. we have i believe guillermo rodriguez from the department of environment on this item. and i believe you have an amendment. >> good morning, supervisors. yes, i do have an amendment i'd like it make on page 1 * to make on page 1. [speaker not understood]. line 8 numeral 5 should be changed to 3 in the bolded section. the 3 ftes that are mentioned, we are correcting that typo. >> if you can speak to the item. >> certainly. just a brief background. this is the fourth contract since 2003 continuing energy efficiency programs in san francisco. the funds
to pass comprehensive legislation, a couple of weeks ago, tony testified in front of the environment and public works committee on why we need to pass and get the safe cosmetics out there on the floor of that senate, he did a fantastic job and i stole this off the video which is archiving, you can watch it, and this act would call for quick action on the chemicals of greatest concern, would increase access to basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those h
the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pen
but this effort is to try to create more smoke free environments at these festivals. many of you already know that exposure to secondhand smoke kills over 73,000 non-smokers each year in the u.s., so it's definitely second hand smoke is a toxic substance that leads to death of many non-smokers in the u.s. and at outdoor events it may exacerbate people's health issues, especially if you have asthma or other respiratory ailments and especially harmful for youth and elderly as well as individuals with these types of illnesses. according to the u.s. surgeon general, there's no safe level of exposure to second hand smoke and it's a cancer (inaudible) as well. outdoors second hand smoke that reach the same levels as indoughs so it's really not safe. for many months breathe california , as an institution working to create this ordinance that would require that a no smoking sign be posted on all street events, that several announcements be made to indicate that events are smoke free and that all promotional materials and advertising materials in events include information that the event is smoke fr
that right balance we can have the spaces used for the different use and it is enjoyment of the environment at the same time for the residents. thank you for being here with this announcement. we get four things out of this. a dog run, heron's head park with the landscape and wonderful access to it. we have the literacy for justice modernization here and of course we have the bi- directional lines for the bicycles and thanks for being here and congratulations to everybody. it has been a great part of this collaboration. this great team work and go giants and now go warriors. [applause] >> thank you mayor lee for your leadership for this development. i want to introduce also monique moyer director of the port. who she began -- became director of the port she noticed how much energy and funds were being focused on the northern waterfront and requested whether or not we could do more in the southern waterfront and i think these projects are an example of how we responded to that challenge, so monique moyer executive director. [applause] >> good morning and thank you. it is wonderful to
in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years sea-going experience serving across various frig
2008 and she has been in congress for jobs and our environment and she been such a great champion of public transportation that even cal train named a loco motor after jackie spear. please welcome congress woman jackie spear. >> thank you mr. mayor. thank you secretary lahood. thank you to the incredible leadership, senator feinstein, nancy pelosi and mayor lee and the board of supervisors to chairman nol an from the sfmta. i am on pins and needles. do we have anything else to report? it's still at the same point we think they're in commercials. i am reminded from the song from "top gun" "take my breath away" and $942 million takes my breath away and i think to mayor lee for that amount i think we should get a leather flight jacket to thank mr. lahood for the great gift to our great city. the new money that is going to be used here is going to create 1,000 new jobs before the end of the year with many more jobs to come after that. that is something to applaud. thank you again secretary lahood for that. this is one point 7 miles very similar to the length of the golden ga
's about if you are immediately engaged in the work environment together, it's allowing for more opportunities selling someone to take on a new project or allowing someone to maybe how could i say flesh out ideas and actually put them in place and then learned from that because not everything is going to be perfect. but knowing that even if it doesn't come out right someone is going to say it's okay. it's okay. we are we to work on getting a better. i think that's where he learned the most about leadership and about how to conduct perfect but it is you want to do. men do it with men and with women, too to read these relationships are always down for women and we shouldn't be ashamed of that. >> we ask you what you were watching when you were 17 that would have made this a little bit easier and you said keep striving. never lose heart. it's not about how much time you get knocked down but it's about how many times you get back up and it's what you do after you get back up and brush yourself off that really matters. i just wondered if there was any specific time you could talk abou
environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david
and i think what you are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional pane
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
out space. it's so much easier to shut down a shop than it is in this environment. the colorado version of the law makes the law enforcement side of this much more challenging. >> and so the next thing that they could do is simply repeal it. and say if you're going to crack down on our regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, then do what you can. >> you might notice that some of the initial ones were rebellious by nature. i think marijuana users describe themselves -- some of them have a distaste for it being legal because they're now abiding with the law. if what there is is a very aggressive response you're going to tap in their rebellious spirit. >> we're seeing a breakdown of a federal relationship. michael will give us a broader context than what we're seeing. >> there is a sort of tempting federalism prospect on this which sees something along the following lines. and angela alluded to this. look, the resurgence of american federalism because states have preferences here. there's no reason. let's experiment. i don't think that's necessarily wrong. bu
's not only bad for the economy, but hurt the environment as well. "varney & company" is about to begin. karen anjeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they' gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> good morning, "varney & company," viewers. today is monday, january 7th and gerard depardieu, well, he's welcomed to russia with open arms and here, we're going to welcome with you open arms, with sandra smith and on the floor of the new york stock exchange, of course, nicole petallides. hey, you remember the cash for clunkers, that 2009 government program that gave people money, a the lot of money to buy more fuel efficient cars if they traded in the old gas guzzlers, as i
and how to give actionable advice requires knowing, and i would argue working in, environments that require close cooperation. that is why our job is not to wait for legal questions to be brought to us or to provide advice on operational decisions after those decisions have been made. our job is to be present at the beginning and throughout the process. just like other senior national security official across the government, the person in my seat, since the creation of nsd, has attended the morning terrorism threat briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigati
business. the combination of policies that are not hostile to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. at the heart of these reforms we need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's critically important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in th
participation. how society and in these environments as the bonds weren't as strong as they were in traditionally organized places. these are arguments for a long time. design, aesthetic and social arguments. but then a big change has been 15 years ago, the economy started talking. nobody listens to planners. which is shouting in the wind about why we feel certain things are certain ways. but i will miss them so me say say this'll make you poor and this make you richer. the.or started saying, these communities are killing us, which i begin to and finally even more recently the environmentalists figured out the city was the way to save the country and the countryside. those three issues, none of which original research on our parts form the basis for having a much more legitimate and arguable support for city life over suburban life. so what are they? the first question to ask is where do people want to be in america? in portland is a prime example. during the 90s, journal and neil population increased by 50%, which was five times the rate. educated no one else went up so much ire
and corporate tax it is time to change so people can keep their own money and foster an environment where businesses want to invest andreate good paying jobs. he would hike the 4 percent sales tax and some say like it up to washington d.c., is that right or wrong? i am dave asbin. we'll go to steve and rich and mike and john, you love this idea and think it is good for the whole, country explain. >> one of the scandal is not the deficits, but the fact that federal government collects 2.5 trillion. with the consumption or sales tax, this is the lone way we can limit how much money gets to the federal government and more businesses would be created and jobs and the federal government would not be penalizing our work and we would get more work and jobs. >> sounds good to me, rick, to you? >> here's the problem. i will not touch incredibly regressive nature of this. >> by regressive, it hits the poor more than the rich? >> exactly. put the brakes on a economy, imagine what happens here. first of all, to keep the revenue neutral, you are looking at a 20r 30 percent sales tax . add that to the
's happening in our immediately environment and what we can see around us and what literally touches us physically. if you're walking through e woods d you hearhe crack of a stick behind you, your body immediately goes into a fear response, a fight or flight response. climate change isn't that kind of a problem. it's not an immediate, visceral threat. and i can say right now, this very day we can look out the window and there's co2, carbon dioxide, pouring out of tailpipes, pouring out of buildings, pouring out of smokestacks. and yet we can't see it, it's invisible. the fundamental causes of this global problem are invisible to us. and likewise the impacts are largely invisible to us as well unless you know where to look. so it's a problem that first of all we can't see. and secondly it's a problem that is seemingly faceless. it's not like terrorists who we can imagine who are coming after us trying to kill us and challenge our fundamental values. it's a problem that we can't see, that's going to have long term impacts that aren't going to just impact us now, but impact us into the fut
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
an interesting expression. she said, i grew up in an environment that was christian in which people followed their christian religion, others followed their muslim religion, and others their african superstitions. for me, this went to the heart of why the book was inevitable, or why, for me, i was engaged this this discourse all my life. it's very strange. i found it very interesting today, close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which for admitting what i believe or for believing what i do not believe to be considered of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that t
environment? >> i will say the film most like the political environment nowadays, of all of the ones that came out whether they were nominated or not was paranormal 4. because it is weird and just keeps happening over and over again. >> jennifer: i think it totally is listen kohn because people put him on a pedestal that stuck to his guns. and he did stick to his guns but he had to roll up his sleeves and do some of the horse trading that had to be done to get the horse trade done. >> yes the issue was not black and white, and there were so many things behind the scenes someone willing to flog through the mud in order to have the ends justify the means, and always along the way tell some pretty hilarious stories. >> stephanie: yeah for sure. so what is the best film that you would recommending of all of these for political junkies? what had you on the edge of your seat? >> it's tough because of the films that were nominated this year, a lot of them we knew what happened in the end. lincoln, you know they end up passing the 14th amendment. we know -- if you read
's also worth noting that we're in a pervasive low interest rate environment right now and i'm concerned at some point, and we have been for successive quarters of us having an interest rate spike, if we have an interest rate spike and we've got inflation, all the loans outstanding, 85% by the way which the government holds, students have a heck of a time paying off the loans in a high interest rate environment, are we creating a debt burden on the students and being unfair to them at the end of the day and that's my main concern as far as this issue is concerned. >> susan, an alternative way to think about this, you don't automatically go to college and wait until you know exactly what you want to do or don't go at all. >> yeah, that's right. i mean, i think there's a case to be made if air not absolutely sure, you know, take your time. my wife, who is much smarter than prettier than i am you know, waited until she was 24, and really figured out what she wanted to do. went off to uc berkley graduated from straight a's and proved that, you know, you could benefit enormously. but there is
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 216 (some duplicates have been removed)

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